Reverberation (echo)

 Putting reverb (echo) on dialogue has to be done with caution. You can distort the words very easily. Take it little-by-little.
 If you work on the computer, SAVE THE ORIGINAL DIALOGUE, so you can go back to it. Then treat the dialogue just 10%, listen to the result, SAVE IT AS A DRAFT. Then treat it another 10%. SAVE THIS AS A DRAFT.

 

Continue on with this procedure until you over-shoot, and it is distorted. And then listen backwards to your draft versions, and decide. To repeat - just a touch of echo should do the job. The context of the scene, and Description or added words in the dialogue to fill in what is 'blind' for the listener, should do the rest.

  Reverberation (echo) - see http://www.answers.com/topic/reverberation. In an enclosed space, multiple reflections are built up. These build up, blend and then fade. It is difficult to hear speech.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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